Moraba Rivas – Rhubarb jam

مربا ریواس

It’s rhubarb season!

Well, actually, the season is about to wrap up, and I am just a little behind in getting this posted! Here in the Pacific Northwest, rhubarb begins to show up in farmer’s markets and grocery stores in April and lasts until late June or early July.

Unlike other seasonal vegetables that are available year-round, you are not likely to find rhubarb outside its prime season. So I say: when you see it, buy it, cook it and preserve it for all the other months of the year when you will not have access to this seasonal vegetable.

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Moraba Havij – Carrot jam

مربا هویج

Who doesn’t love spreading a healthy dose of homemade jam on toasted and buttered crusty bread? For some, there may be something strange about jam that’s made without fruit, but I would encourage anyone to try this brightly orange-colored and flavorful carrot jam.

Making jam is an age-old tradition in Iran (and the rest of the world); it dates back to the 12th century in ancient Persia. This was an essential means of preserving food far beyond the growing and harvest seasons. This tradition was also adopted and spread through many cultures who then put their own unique mark in the middle east and Mediterranean regions.

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Om’let-e Gojeh Farangi – Tomato omelet

املت گوجه فرنگی

Want a quick, easy, and yet flavorful meal, be it breakfast, lunch, or dinner? Then Persian omelet is the answer! What we refer to as Om’let in Iran is essentially a simple, open-faced omelet with very few ingredients but with a Persian twist.

Onions are slowly cooked into golden perfection before being further colored by the addition of turmeric powder. The optional addition of tomato paste and garlic ensures the flavors are enhanced. A few eggs are then cracked on top, and a touch of salt and pepper and a sprinkle of fresh herbs make this dish simply divine.

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Aash-e Sholeh Ghalamkar – Hearty beans and rice stew with beef and herbs

آش شله قلمکار

What looks like a soup or a stew, but is neither? It is Aash!

Aash is a slow-cooked Persian dish that combines a variety of beans, grains, sometimes noodles, herbs, spices and meat. Its texture most resembles a thick soup.

Aash is quite versatile and has many variations. It can be a comfort food, but it can also be served “majlesie style” – meaning the kind of meal you’d serve at a fancy dinner party. It can be the main course, or be served in small quantities as part of a family-style spread. Aash has its roots in traditional Iranian holidays such as Nowruz, the Persian New Year.

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Moraba-ye Beh – Quince jam with rosewater

مربای به

Let there be jam! Homemade jams are such an integral part of Persian culture and cuisine. Quince is one of those rare and sometimes underappreciated tart and crisp fruits that are best enjoyed either cooked in a stew or made into a jam.

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