Khoresh Rivas – Beef and herb stew with rhubarb

خورش ریواس

Khoresh Rivas is yet another Persian stew that celebrates the abundance of fresh herbs and Iranians’ never ending love affair with sour flavors. In the rest of the world rhubarb’s sourness is almost always moderated with sugar or strawberries, but Iranians use rhubarb in savory dishes precisely because of its sour flavor.

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Khoresh Seeb – Beef and yellow split pea stew with apples

خورش سیب

Khoresh Seeb is a highly adaptable stew whose stars are the firm and tart apples (Seeb in Farsi) that are gently sauteed in butter or ghee and then placed on top of the stew as it finishes cooking.

The base of this dish is made with beef and yellow split peas, patiently cooked in a turmeric and tomato sauce which by itself is often called Gheymeh. Gheymeh is not only served alongside fried or roasted potatoes, but is also used as a decorative topping on various dishes such as Aash.

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Khoresh Aloo Esfenaj – Spinach and golden plum stew with lamb

خورش آلو اسفناج

What I love most about this stew is that it showcases the easier side of Persian cuisine. Many of our Khoresh (stews) use multiple ingredients and take a long while to cook, but Khoresh Aloo Esfenaj has a simpler ingredient list and is easy to prepare for a weeknight meal.

The most unique item in this dish is Aloo Zard, Persian golden plums. These are not only bright and beautiful in color, but more importantly they are much more dynamic and flavorful than many plum varieties which tend to be just sweet. Aloo-Zard is both tart and sweet, and simply more flavorful.

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Khoresh Bij Bij – Caspian Sea stew with poached eggs

خورش بیج بیج

Bij Bij is not only a fun name for a dish, it is also a staple for Caspian Sea folks. People from Iran’s Mazandaran Province call this dish “Vavishka” (clearly a name that originated in Russia), but in Tehran those who know of it call it Bij Bij. It is a comfort dish, made with ground meat, caramelized onions and spices, all cooked in a rich tomato sauce, and with eggs poached right in the middle. An all-round simple and flavorful dish that can be prepared in about an hour, with very little effort.

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Khoresh Fesenjoon – Chicken in pomegranate and walnut sauce

خورش فسنجون

This is fesenjoon, another national culinary treasure of Iran. There aren’t many dishes that give you as much pleasure and joy of eating as fesenjoon! It’s inherently a simple dish, showcasing a perfect blend of simple and yet flavorful ingredients that are abundant in Iran, making it a celebration of natural resources.

The dish starts with walnuts that are ground into a coarse powder and features lightly-browned chicken pieces that are patiently cooked to tenderness in a pomegranate sauce. Choosing the best quality ingredients will ensure you have the best fesenjoon on the block!

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Khoresh Bamieh – Okra and beef stew

خورش بامیه

Khoresh Bamieh comes originally from Khuzestan province in southern Iran, where it is traditionally prepared with a tamarind sauce. This variety, which is more common elsewhere in Iran, substitutes tomato sauce for the the less well known tamarind.

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Mella Ghormeh – Eggplant and tomato herb stew with poached eggs

ملا قورمه

This was another dish that I got to make with mom while visiting her in Chicago earlier this year.   Mella Ghormeh is a simple northern Iranian / Caspian sea dish which is incredibly simple to make.  A tasty dish that starts with sauteing onions, garlic, and eggplants followed by adding dried herbs, tomatoes and water.  The eggplants are cooked until they become tender, eggs are then cracked on top and poached in the broth for about 5 minutes.  As with most Caspian Sea dishes, it is served with rice and yogurt on the side. 

Nooshe-jan!  (Bon appetit!)