Khoresh Rivas – Beef and herb stew with rhubarb

خورش ریواس

Khoresh Rivas is yet another Persian stew that celebrates the abundance of fresh herbs and Iranians’ never ending love affair with sour flavors. In the rest of the world rhubarb’s sourness is almost always moderated with sugar or strawberries, but Iranians use rhubarb in savory dishes precisely because of its sour flavor.

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Kalam Polo Shirazi – Cabbage and rice pilaf with meatballs

کلم پلو شیرازی

A traditional and popular dish from the city of Shiraz, Kalam Polo consists of cabbage and small meatballs layered into rice, with – of course – an exotic combination of spices, herbs and flavors.

Shiraz, known for its beautiful gardens and its deep poetic tradition (it was the home of both Hafez and Sa’adi), is also a significant contributor to Persian cuisine, to which it brings its own unique identity. Shirazis are proud of the many local ingredients and foods that reflect the region’s climate, culture and lifestyle. Shiraz wine, anyone?!

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Meygoo Polo – Rice with herbs and prawns

میگو پلو

Meygoo Polo originated in Iran’s southern provinces of Khuzestan and Bushehr. It’s not surprising that this seafood dish comes from provinces that are located on the shores of the Persian Gulf.

Meygoo is the Farsi word for prawns, which are a staple for the residents of the Persian gulf region. This dish brings together warming spices and blends them with cups of fresh herbs, all layered in a pot full of light and fluffy rice. As with most traditional dishes, local and regional touches influence the specific ingredients.

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Kuku Sabzi – Fresh herb and leek frittata

کوکو سبزی

Welcome to the world of herbs! Herbs play a significant role in Persian cuisine, whether they are served fresh as an appetizer with bread and cheese or cooked into Kuku or Khoresht.

Herbs are integrated into Persian dishes not only to brighten up the colors and bring a brilliant herbal taste, but also to create luscious and earthy sauces. Ghormeh sabzi, Saak, and Khoresht-e Karafs are good examples.

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Khoresh Ghormeh Sabzi -Beef and fresh herb stew

خورش قورمه سبزی

This is Ghormeh Sabzi, by many accounts Iran’s national dish!

Yes, there are Fesenjoon, Khoresht-e Bademjan and Zereshk Polo, and a myriad of other stews and rice dishes, not to mention a long list of Kebabs. But there is something so very special about Ghormeh Sabzi.

To learn about this dish is to learn some of the very specific nuances of Persian culture, tradition and cuisine.

This dish is an internal contradiction, much like Iran herself. The ancient Persian Empire vs. modern-day Iran; pre-revolution vs. post-revolution; traditional dishes vs. fast food.

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Dast Peech-e Gusht – Persian meatloaf with fresh herbs and barberries

دست پیچ گوشت

You thought only your grandmother made the best meatloaf? Well, who knew, Persians make meatloaf too and they are not shy about stuffing lots of flavors into them. The main component that remains consistent is the signature Persian flavor profile; a touch of sweet that is balanced with sour and the refreshing company of fresh herbs.

Disclaimer: my grandmother did not make us meatloaves!

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Aash-e Sholeh Ghalamkar – Hearty beans and rice stew with beef and herbs

آش شله قلمکار

What looks like a soup or a stew, but is neither? It is Aash!

Aash is a slow-cooked Persian dish that combines a variety of beans, grains, sometimes noodles, herbs, spices and meat. Its texture most resembles a thick soup.

Aash is quite versatile and has many variations. It can be a comfort food, but it can also be served “majlesie style” – meaning the kind of meal you’d serve at a fancy dinner party. It can be the main course, or be served in small quantities as part of a family-style spread. Aash has its roots in traditional Iranian holidays such as Nowruz, the Persian New Year.

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Nargesi – Spinach, parsley and mint sauté with poached eggs

نرگسی

A peasant food, at its core! And let’s face it, I’d eat like a peasant any day when the dish tastes this rich and yummy, and is yet very simple, quick and inexpensive!

Nargesi’s origin is back in the Caspian Sea region of Iran, where produce and vegetables are abundant. Spinach is a cherished and prized leafy green that is not only eaten raw in salads, but also cooked in various stews. It is a common belief in Iran that spinach adds flavor and more importantly a certain level of viscosity to stews.

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Khoresh Karafs – Celery and beef stew with fresh herbs

خورش کرفس

Khoresh Karafs, a popular stew in Persian cuisine is remarkably flavorful with very few ingredients. Celery is sauteed on its own to enhance its flavor, then combined with herbs, beef, and Limu Omani which brings magic to this dish!

Celery, oh celery! Let’s face it, celery probably isn’t the kind of vegetable that makes you jump up and down with excitement. So bear with me as I try to convince you that this dish is not your average celery stick dipped in ranch sauce, like an edible spoon. Celery has a unique flavor that seems like it’s always best paired with something else: ranch dressing, nut butter, hummus, or various dips.

To make matters worse, celery seems to be an obligatory ingredient in those ever-so-popular smoothies, perhaps to compensate for the sugar content in your “healthy” smoothie!

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Salad-e seeb torsh ba kheeyar – Apple and cucumber salad with fresh herbs and lime

سالاد سیب ترش با خیار

Persian cucumbers have ruined it for me! When you grow up eating cucumbers in the way that Americans eat apples and oranges, you are in for a disappointment the first time you cross paths with an ordinary cucumber. Persian cucumbers are delicate, high on cucumber flavor, and low on the chalky/bitterness factor. Their skins are sweet and soft, though frequently peeled and sprinkled with salt and pepper, allowing the cucumber to be eaten as you would eat a banana.

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