Aash Reshteh – Persian noodle soup

آش رشته

This is Aash Reshteh, one of the most popular and well-loved members of the Aash family, which has nearly 50 varieties. Aash is a Persian term used to describe a very thick style of soup.

Important ingredients for this dish are heaping amounts of herbs and various beans, but the signature ingredients are Kashk and Reshteh. Kashk is liquid whey derived from yogurt, and Reshteh is a noodle which has an appearance that’s reminiscent of linguine but a very different flavor profile.

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Abgoosht – Meat and potato stew with beans

آبگوشت

Abgoosht is the original Persian rustic “one pot meal” that dates back to centuries ago when simple ingredients were gathered and thrown in a pot to accompany tougher cuts of meat that needed to cook for a long time.

Nowadays, with easy access to a wide range of ingredients, this once modest dish has become quite elevated! More vegetables have found their way into this one pot meal, alongside traditional Persian spices. Consequently, each family has developed their own version of Abgoosht.

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Khoresh Aloo Esfenaj – Spinach and golden plum stew with lamb

خورش آلو اسفناج

What I love most about this stew is that it showcases the easier side of Persian cuisine. Many of our Khoresh (stews) use multiple ingredients and take a long while to cook, but Khoresh Aloo Esfenaj has a simpler ingredient list and is easy to prepare for a weeknight meal.

The most unique item in this dish is Aloo Zard, Persian golden plums. These are not only bright and beautiful in color, but more importantly they are much more dynamic and flavorful than many plum varieties which tend to be just sweet. Aloo-Zard is both tart and sweet, and simply more flavorful.

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Kalam Polo Shirazi – Cabbage and rice pilaf with meatballs

کلم پلو شیرازی

A traditional and popular dish from the city of Shiraz, Kalam Polo consists of cabbage and small meatballs layered into rice, with – of course – an exotic combination of spices, herbs and flavors.

Shiraz, known for its beautiful gardens and its deep poetic tradition (it was the home of both Hafez and Sa’adi), is also a significant contributor to Persian cuisine, to which it brings its own unique identity. Shirazis are proud of the many local ingredients and foods that reflect the region’s climate, culture and lifestyle. Shiraz wine, anyone?!

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Khoresh Bij Bij – Caspian Sea stew with poached eggs

خورش بیج بیج

Bij Bij is not only a fun name for a dish, it is also a staple for Caspian Sea folks. People from Iran’s Mazandaran Province call this dish “Vavishka” (clearly a name that originated in Russia), but in Tehran those who know of it call it Bij Bij. It is a comfort dish, made with ground meat, caramelized onions and spices, all cooked in a rich tomato sauce, and with eggs poached right in the middle. An all-round simple and flavorful dish that can be prepared in about an hour, with very little effort.

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Om’let-e Gojeh Farangi – Tomato omelet

املت گوجه فرنگی

Want a quick, easy and yet flavorful meal, be it breakfast, lunch or dinner? Then Persian omelet is the answer! What we refer to as Om’let in Iran is essentially a simple, open faced omelet with very few ingredients but with a Persian twist.

Onions are slowly cooked into golden perfection before being further colored by the addition of turmeric powder. The optional addition of tomato paste and garlic ensures the flavors are enhanced. A few eggs are then cracked on top, and a touch of salt and pepper and a sprinkle of fresh herbs make this dish simply divine.

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Kashk – Persian whey sauce

کشک

Kashk is a full-fat yogurt that is cooked with water until most of the liquid is evaporated and then strained through a cheesecloth. The pulp is then rehydrated with some water and salt to create a reasonably thick sauce-like consistency. The end result is pure umami: a little salt, a lot of tang and a whole lot of flavor! In Persian cuisine, Kashk is either blended into dishes or quite often drizzled on top of them.

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Naan Sangak – Persian flatbread

نان سنگک

Bread is deeply integrated into Persian culture, and many types of flatbread appear on the Persian table to accompany breakfast, lunch and dinner. One of these is Sangak, which is truly unique in both its flavor and its baking techniques.

Sangak is the Farsi word for the little rocks or pebbles which ultimately make this bread different from all others. The dough is baked on a layer of hot pebbles, giving this bread its signature look of an uneven surface with many indentations.

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Soup-e Jow – Barley soup

سوپ جو

Soup-e Jow is a delightfully simple and flavorful soup, but is not really well-known in the line-up of Persian soups and Aashes. (Aash is a Farsi word for a thick soup, like a cross between a soup and a stew.) The barley offers an earthy flavor and satisfying chew, while lemon juice contributes a refreshing sourness. Carrots bring a brilliant color, and milk adds creamy richness.

This soup was a favorite of my family’s when I was growing up in Iran, and I remember looking forward to it every time Mom prepared it.

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Kayk-e Baghlava – Baklava cake

کیک باقلوا

It is that time of year: once again, Nourouz is here!

With the arrival of Nourouz, the Persian New Year, every Iranian diligently gathers specific items to be elegantly displayed on their Haftseen table (see more details below).

This is a lesser-known version of baklava that takes the form of a cake, instead of the flaky filo pastry that people are most familiar with. But it has all the familiar flavors that you would expect from a Persian baklava, such as rose water, ground nuts and cardamon. In Farsi, this cake is also called Kayk-e Sharbatie, referring to the syrup that is poured over the baked cake.

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